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Search Results

  • Parent participation: a model of balanced involvement

    The ability of parents of children with disabilities in fostering and influencing community understanding and attitudes is crucial, and this paper argues that the role of parents should be seen as complementary to the specific skills offered by a variety of professionals.

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  • Mobilise

    This article encourages parents of children with disabilities to become more assertive. It shows how effective assertive statements are when compared to aggressive or non-assertive statements, and how assertive behaviour gives one strength "to take on the world".

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  • Parents and community together: Parent questionnaire

    STAR, a Victorian family support group, produced a questionnaire for parents regarding the support parents have experienced and what they thought was needed instead or additionally. This paper lists the questions and responses. While it doesn't go into detail it provides helpful information on how other parents found help and where.

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  • People you need on side

    This brief article gives helpful examples of parents finding ways to interact with the professionals they must see regularly because of the health needs of their child with a disability. Keyword: Families

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  • Dealing with professionals

    This is a pamphlet which provides very good strategies for dealing with professionals, when those professionals are not being as helpful as they could be and when parents feel they are being discouraged from participating in decisions about their child. Keywords: Families, Professionals

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  • Parental reactions and conflicts

    This short article lists the common patterns of stress experienced by families who have a child with a disability. The author explains some of the reasons which underpin these patterns which include our tendency to experience our children as extensions of ourselves and the belief that finding fulfilment through a...

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  • Guidelines to follow....when a child with a disability is born

    This pamphlet recognises that the occasion of the birth of a child with a disability needs special management by hospital and medical staff, who should remain sensitive and non-judgemental. It outlines a procedure for telling parents, the basic management of the family in hospital and the creation of links for...

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  • We all need parents but not forever

    In this short article, David Brandon argues that parents should not have to be involved in running services for their sons and daughters with disabilities. He likens it to continuing to run the lives of his two sons , now in their twenties, and says that the consumers of services...

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  • Women, disability and caring

    The main responsibility for caring for their children belongs to women. This article examines the underlying assumptions about the roles of mothers of children with disabilities and how stereotypical gender roles influence the caring of a child within a family.

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  • Families for all children

    The articles in this paper are based on the argument that families whose children have severe disabilities should be supported in as many ways as they need, and that children who cannot stay with their birth families deserve to live with other families.

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