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Search Results

  • Living in the community: Independence, support and transition

    This article covers a broad range of topics of relevance to the Inclusion Collection: community or independent living, inclusion, individualised supports and what has been termed 'transition'. The author analyses the main paradigm shifts within the independent living movement - from one based upon rehabilitation to one based upon support.

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  • Statement in support of adults living in the community

    This statement revolves around 3 themes, each of which challenges current service systems. The first theme revolves around the need and right of people to live in a place of their choice and separate from service provision.

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  • A Bed in a House is not a Home

    QPPD's policy embraces the right of all adults with disabilities to be able to live and be supported in a home that reflects their individual wants and needs. There are some definite 'essentials' to what constitutes a 'good' and appropriate home life: for example, finding a home is about having...

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  • UNESCO and Special Education

    A good introduction to inclusive education at the international level. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) has a very clear mission about inclusion with in its special education work. For UNESCO, inclusive education is seen in terms of broader school reform aimed at accommodating diversity and offering...

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  • Costliness: An essential element of advocacy

    The author concentrates on an essential element of advocacy practice - that of the 'likelihood of costliness' to the person providing advocacy support. In fact, 'costliness' is a central measure of effectiveness and quality of advocacy effort.

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  • How to avoid the seven pitfalls of systematic planning: A school and community plan for transition

    Transition services are intended to provide young people with access to relevant post secondary educational opportunities or employment/meaningful day activities. The authors offer a process of 'systematic planning' to achieve these goals, but also a list of seven 'pitfalls' that may impede such a process and ways to avoid them.

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  • Unto us a child is born: The trials and rewards of parenthood for people with learning difficulties

    This is an excellent example of 'person-centred' research, in which the authors state "Our aim is not to (list) the pros and cons of parenthood for people with learning difficulties* but to convey something of the joys and heartaches it brought for the families in our study in a way...

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  • Putting us out of your misery - Euthanasia: Why I am against it

    In this article, Hume outlines what state-sanctioned euthanasia, i.e. legalised euthanasia, would mean for people with disabilities, especially those with very high support needs who may not be able to speak for themselves. She backs her argument up with information from the Dutch experience.

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  • The kid from Cabin 17

    Chauncey, a boy with very high support needs, attended a summer camp with 200 other children in which he made a number of friends and generally had an excellent time. The article lists a number of lessons that people learned about his inclusion in summer camp (these lessons can be...

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  • Integration through recreation: A practical response

    IntoRec is a community based recreation organisation based in Townsville. This article clearly describes its work, the challenges the organisation has faced and the way it has/continues to meet these challenges. IntoRec is not a recreation program, rather it provides an opportunity for people to access community organisations which will...

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