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Search Results

  • Skills for using formal resources

    This paper suggests some techniques for parents of children with disabilities to use in dealing effectively with agencies, institutions and professionals, and in ways which are also self empowering. It emphasises that knowledge and skill are very powerful - "they are meant to be used as tools, not weapons".

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  • Normalisation

    This paper clearly sets out what is meant by the term "normalisation" (social role valorisation). It quotes the very personal terms of interpretation used by Nirje,who first gave prominence to the term in the late 1960s and crystallised it into a principle , and Wolfensberger, Director of the Training Institute...

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  • Meeting the socio sexual needs of severely impaired adults

    This article by Wolfensberger - Director of the Training Institute for Human Service Planning and Change Agentry at Syracuse University - describes his experience of visiting a particular hostel in Sweden where, as the residents are socialised into the culture and into adulthood, they are also socialised into culturally normative...

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  • The Principle of Normalisation: A Foundation for Effective Services

    John O'Brien who, together with his wife (Connie Lyle) focuses on assisting organisations respond effectively to the needs of individuals, presents this paper which defines the principle of normalisation (social role valorisation) and highlights program features which influence the quality of life it supports for those it serves.

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  • A critical look at professionals

    This paper takes a critical look at professionals and argues that the justification of workers to intervene in someone else's life has to be well targeted and clearly defined. The author describes some of the unfortunate practices by professionals and services, and some of the basic principles upon which services...

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  • Individual empowerment and social service accountability

    This Canadian paper provides a comprehensive overview of the service brokerage concept and clarifies some of its more important operational aspects. It begins by citing current problems and issues caused by circumstances working against people's basic rights and freedoms, and goes on to describe the role and process of service brokerage.

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  • Hugs all Around! How Nicholas McCullough Came Home

    This is a short story about community. It comes from one of the most isolated places in Canada - a small fishing village in the province of Nova Scotia. At the centre of the story is a boy named Nicholas McCullough who spent most of life in a hospital for...

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  • Breaking Barriers: Educating People about Disability

    The authors write, "Our aim in this book is to show how community education can become a reality and although it may take many forms, the goal remains the same: the full participation of disabled people in community life.

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  • Mandate for Quality: Volume III, Changing the System: An analysis of New Brunswick's approach

    This is the last publication in a series intended to assist Canadians in the development of services and supports for people with intellectual disabilities in the move from institutions to more community based lifestyles (see also File no's 3060 and 3061).

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  • Mandate for Quality: Volume II, Missing the Mark: An analysis of the Ontario government's Five Year Plan

    This is the second publication in a series of three, that were designed to assist Canadians (but the theory and philosophy were relevant to Australia) in the development of services and support for people with intellectual disabilities in the move from institutional life to one that was more community based.

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