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Search Results

  • Values in end-of-life decison-making: some implications for people with a disability

    " ..This article considers some of the values - such as materialism, mono-culturalism, individualism and economic rationalism - which underpin current trends in end of life decision making. The author goes on to consider some of the implications of the tactic acceptance of these values for the quality of life...

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  • Changing from segregation to inclusion - a report on a visit to the Forest Grove School District, Oregon, USA

    This report is written about a community which has successfully transformed its whole school system (an ongoing process and challenge). What the author say was an education system driven by a conscious belief in the value of all children.

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  • That which binds us: Friendships as a safe harbour in a storm

    The Strully's have written an excellent and simple piece about the necessity of friendships in their daughter's life. In fact, they unequivocally state that it is friendship that will ultimtately mean life or death for their daughter. It is the only real safeguard of a person's human rights.

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  • Students as instructional agents

    A chapter concerning itself with strategies for achieving truly inclusive classrooms and schools. The authors ask teachers and school administrators to view students as 'knowers' as well as 'learners'. If students are also teachers it creates a co-operative pro-learning atmosphere.

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  • Sharing expertise and responsibilities through teaching teams

    This will make a great resource for teachers. Building upon the idea of student co-operative learning groups, the authors argue that 'teaching' (like 'learning') need not be a lonely affair. As such they define what 'teaching teams' are, provide essential elements that make such teams effective and then provide case...

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  • One student's experience with college life

    This is an article about how one young woman with an intellectual disability went to university. Specifically it details how the particular university was decided upon, how the supports and schedules were arranged, who is involved in this woman's support and what their roles are.

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  • Helping individuals with severe disabilities find leisure activities

    A rather technical piece, this article provides some really good guidelines for selecting leisure activities for individuals with high support needs. These guidelines include such things as a program philosophy and practice of inclusion, age appropriateness, likes and dislikes of the person, personal assistance strategies and adaptations, meaningful participation (even...

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  • Information needs of siblings

    This short article provides parents with ways they can inform sons and daughters at different ages about their brothers'/sisters' disability. While some parts of the article are questionable, the article is useful particularly in the author's obvious belief that empowerment of and advocacy by brothers and sisters is of fundamental...

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  • Promoting a culture of inclusion

    There are a number of levels at which true inclusion in Australia must occur - the author chooses to focus on iniatives around people with a disability from non English speaking backgrounds (NESB) at a Federal Government level.

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  • Assuring quality in supported employment

    The concept of supported employment encompasses the belief that work should promote the dignity of an individual and enhance his or her role in society. Given this values-base and the fact that supported employment focuses on individual outcomes, the use of quality assurance systems in improving inclusive employment services is...

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